21 01, 2023

Non-surgical occlusal plane cant resolution with lingual straight-wire appliance and miniscrews in a class II asymmetric adult patient

2023-01-21T16:55:19+00:00

Int Orthod. 2023 Jan 18;21(1):100726. doi: 10.1016/j.ortho.2023.100726. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

This case report describes a complex class II case with important maxillo-mandibular asymmetry in an adult patient treated with lingual straight-wire appliance. With the twofold aim of obtaining dramatic aesthetic improvement, since the patient refused surgical option, and ideal occlusal relationship, accurate set-up planification and biomechanical strategies with TADS for occlusal plane cant correction are needed to achieve the planned results. This case report demonstrates the possibility of solving successfully class II malocclusion with significant asymmetry in adult patient without surgery by means of an aesthetic appliance; on the other hand, it underlines the necessity of miniscrews and auxiliaries in order to obtain the best results.

PMID:36669459 | DOI:10.1016/j.ortho.2023.100726

Non-surgical occlusal plane cant resolution with lingual straight-wire appliance and miniscrews in a class II asymmetric adult patient2023-01-21T16:55:19+00:00
13 01, 2023

Invisible treatment of an asymmetric adult class II malocclusion related to unilateral upper lateral incisor agenesis with a straight wire lingual appliance, mini-screw and premolar extraction: A case report

2023-01-13T22:20:05+00:00

Int Orthod. 2023 Jan 5;21(1):100721. doi: 10.1016/j.ortho.2022.100721. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

This case report describes a complex full-step class II malocclusion with unilateral upper lateral incisor agenesis in an adult patient treated with lingual straight-wire appliance and premolar extraction, with the two-fold aim of obtaining ideal occlusal relationship and smile aesthetic improvement. In view of this, it underlines how an appropriate treatment strategy, including extraction choice and anchorage control during space closure, is needed to achieve the planned results with a completely invisible lingual appliance combined with aesthetic veneers.

PMID:36610255 | DOI:10.1016/j.ortho.2022.100721

Invisible treatment of an asymmetric adult class II malocclusion related to unilateral upper lateral incisor agenesis with a straight wire lingual appliance, mini-screw and premolar extraction: A case report2023-01-13T22:20:05+00:00
24 11, 2022

Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and anatomical factors: possible correlations

2022-11-24T12:58:49+00:00

Sleep Sci. 2022 Oct-Dec;15(4):429-435. doi: 10.5935/1984-0063.20220074.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The following retrospective study was devised with the aim of evaluating the correlation between OSAS and various anatomical factors.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-seven patients over the age of 40 were analyzed, of which 19 were classified as OSAS cases and 18 as control cases. For each, 17 anatomical variables were identified and examined using Invivo Dental software on CBCT scans, WebCeph software on laterolateral teleradiographs, and Rhinoceros 6.0 software on dental casts.

RESULTS: A generalized linear model of all the anatomical factors identified only two statistically significant variables. Specifically, the total volume of the palate displayed a inverse correlation with OSAS, while the distance between the S point and the Go point (S-Go) exhibited a direct correlation with the disease.

CONCLUSION: The likelihood of an individual having OSAS appears to decrease as the volume of the palate increases but increase as the lingual measure S-Go increases.

PMID:36419816 | PMC:PMC9670767 | DOI:10.5935/1984-0063.20220074

Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and anatomical factors: possible correlations2022-11-24T12:58:49+00:00
6 11, 2022

Three-dimensional assessment of teeth first-, second- and third-order position in Caucasian and African subjects with ideal occlusion

2022-11-06T17:18:49+00:00

Prog Orthod. 2015;16:11. doi: 10.1186/s40510-015-0086-9. Epub 2015 May 26.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to provide an updated version of Andrews’ seminal study by exploiting 3D software to analyse the tip, torque and in-out values of two groups of different racial and ethnic background.

METHODS: The analysis was conducted on one Caucasian group (30 individuals) and one of African origin (29). All subjects were adult, in normal occlusion and had no previous history of orthodontic treatment. Rhinoceros™ 3D modelling software was used to identify anatomical reference points, planes and axes and to make the appropriate measurements.

RESULTS: Compared to Andrews’ measurements, we found more positive coronal tip values in both African and Caucasian subjects, while the torque values we measured tended to be less negative in the posterior sectors than those reported by Andrews. We measured greater tip values in the lower jaw of Caucasian with respect to African subjects, particularly in the middle sectors.

CONCLUSIONS: Race and ethnicity have a strong influence on values of tip, torque and in-out. This is translated as a more positive tip in Caucasian subjects and a more positive torque in those of African descent (greater proclination of the incisors). Finally, with respect to the values reported by Andrews, we found a tendency to more positive mean tip (except for at the upper second molars and lower incisors) and less negative torque in the posterior sectors.

PMID:26061990 | PMC:PMC4442781 | DOI:10.1186/s40510-015-0086-9

Three-dimensional assessment of teeth first-, second- and third-order position in Caucasian and African subjects with ideal occlusion2022-11-06T17:18:49+00:00
6 11, 2022

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Patients With Different Facial Morphology. A Systematic Review of the Literature

2022-11-06T17:18:49+00:00

J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2016 Jan;74(1):29-46. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2015.07.006. Epub 2015 Jul 18.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The present article aimed to review systematically the literature on the relation between facial skeletal structures and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic search in the dental and medical literature was performed to identify all studies of humans assessing the relation between TMJ disorders and facial morphology. Articles were included based on study design, irrespective of TMJ disorder (eg, disc displacement, osteoarthrosis, or unspecified), skeletal features, diagnostic strategies (e.g., imaging techniques or clinical assessment), and population (eg, demographic features of participants) under investigation. The selected articles were assessed according to a format based on patients, problem, and population, intervention, comparison, and outcome and quality was evaluated based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale.

RESULTS: Thirty-four articles were included in the review, 27 of which concerned adult samples and 7 concerned adolescent samples. Quality was generally moderate. The articles dealt with the relation between facial morphology and the following TMJ disorders, assessed clinically or by magnetic resonance (MR): disc displacement (n = 20), osteoarthritis or osteoarthrosis (n = 8), and temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms (n = 6). The different approaches featuring the various investigations and the presence of some potential methodologic biases complicated a summary of the findings. Most studies reported that some features related to the vertical dimension of the face might help distinguish patients with potential TMJ disc displacement or MR-detected signs of osteoarthrosis from those without TMJ disorders.

CONCLUSIONS: The quality of the available literature is not adequate to provide an evidence base on the topic. Despite the heterogeneity of design and findings of the reviewed articles, it seems reasonable to suggest that skeletal Class II profiles and hyperdivergent growth patterns are likely associated with an increased frequency of TMJ disc displacement and degenerative disorders.

PMID:26255097 | DOI:10.1016/j.joms.2015.07.006

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Patients With Different Facial Morphology. A Systematic Review of the Literature2022-11-06T17:18:49+00:00
6 11, 2022

Orthodontics is temporomandibular disorder-neutral

2022-11-06T17:18:48+00:00

Angle Orthod. 2016 Jul;86(4):649-54. doi: 10.2319/051015-318.1. Epub 2015 Oct 29.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess if subjects with a clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a similar prevalence of orthodontic history as a population of TMD-free individuals and to assess if those subjects who have a history of ideal orthodontics have fewer symptoms than those with a history of nonideal orthodontics.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two groups of age- and sex-matched individuals belonging to either a study (“TMD”) or a control group were recruited. Subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment were classified as having a history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics based on the current presence of normal values in five reference occlusal features.

RESULTS: The correlation with a history of orthodontic treatment was not clinically significant for any of the TMD diagnoses (ie, muscle pain, joint pain, disc displacement, arthrosis), with Phi (Φ) coefficient values within the -0.120 to 0.058 range. Within the subset of patients with a history of orthodontics, the correlation of ideal or nonideal orthodontic treatment with TMD diagnoses was, in general, not clinically relevant or was weakly relevant.

CONCLUSIONS: Findings confirmed the substantial absence of clinically significant effects of orthodontics as far as TMD is concerned. The very low correlation values of a negative or positive history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics with the different TMD diagnoses suggest that orthodontic treatment could not have a true role for TMD.

PMID:26512757 | PMC:PMC8601478 | DOI:10.2319/051015-318.1

Orthodontics is temporomandibular disorder-neutral2022-11-06T17:18:48+00:00
6 11, 2022

Comparison of dental and alveolar arch forms between different ethnic groups

2022-11-06T17:18:48+00:00

Int Orthod. 2015 Dec;13(4):462-88. doi: 10.1016/j.ortho.2015.09.013. Epub 2015 Nov 4.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate, by means of 3D software, any correlation between ethnic group and the shape and size of the dental arcade and its bony support, and to investigate the correspondence between the latter two variables within each ethnic group. The data gathered were also compared with the measurements of commercially available pre-formed archwires to determine which provide the best fit for each arch in each group.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The shape and size of the dental and alveolar arches of 29 subjects of African origin and 37 Caucasian subjects were compared in terms of linear inter-canine, inter-premolar and inter-molar measurements, overall arch length, and the distance between each tooth and the reference occlusal plane. To determine which pre-formed archwires are best suited to each of the two ethnic groups, the in-out of the brackets was considered, simulating their presence in the oral cavity.

RESULTS: The upper and lower dental and alveolar arches were all wider and longer in African with respect to Caucasian subjects (P<0.05). In general, “Roth small” (index value 1.556) and “Ideal Form Medium” (index value 0.645) archwires were better suited to both upper and lower arcades in the latter group, while “Damon” (index value 1.447) and “Ideal Form Large” (index value 1.695) conformed better to the size and shape of both arcades in the former.

CONCLUSIONS: There are very significant differences in arch form between the two ethnic groups considered, and the range of pre-formed archwires on the market does not provide for the anatomical variability of patients.

PMID:26545346 | DOI:10.1016/j.ortho.2015.09.013

Comparison of dental and alveolar arch forms between different ethnic groups2022-11-06T17:18:48+00:00
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